Art History Lecture Series with Rebecca Albiani

The Frye Art Museum presents a new season of lectures by art historian Rebecca Albiani exploring masterpieces of world art.

Frye Members receive a discount on classes and lectures.
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About the Instructor

Rebecca Albiani has been an arts lecturer at the Frye Art Museum since 1997. She was a Graduate Lecturing Fellow at Washington’s National Gallery and a Fulbright Scholar in Venice. She received an MA from Stanford University and a BA from the University of California, Berkeley.

2018–19 Art History Lecture Series


Upcoming Events

Thursday, January 10 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
The Social Conscience of Pop Art
We think of Pop Art as cool and fun and apolitical, but it was intimately connected to its turbulent times. Andy Warhol depicted the Civil Rights Movement, James Rosenquist took on the Vietnam war, and Rosalyn Drexler addressed violence against women.

Thursday, January 10 7:00 – 8:00 pm
The Social Conscience of Pop Art
We think of Pop Art as cool and fun and apolitical, but it was intimately connected to its turbulent times. Andy Warhol depicted the Civil Rights Movement, James Rosenquist took on the Vietnam war, and Rosalyn Drexler addressed violence against women.

Friday, January 11 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
The Social Conscience of Pop Art
We think of Pop Art as cool and fun and apolitical, but it was intimately connected to its turbulent times. Andy Warhol depicted the Civil Rights Movement, James Rosenquist took on the Vietnam war, and Rosalyn Drexler addressed violence against women.

Thursday, February 14 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Michelangelo's Passionate Friendships
In the 1530s Michelangelo was smitten by handsome young nobleman Tommaso Cavalieri and began an ardent friendship with aristocratic widow Vittoria Colonna. He expressed his feelings for these soul mates with sonnets and beautifully finished drawings.

Thursday, February 14 7:00 – 8:00 pm
Michelangelo's Passionate Friendships
In the 1530s Michelangelo was smitten by handsome young nobleman Tommaso Cavalieri and began an ardent friendship with aristocratic widow Vittoria Colonna. He expressed his feelings for these soul mates with sonnets and beautifully finished drawings.

Friday, February 15 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Michelangelo's Passionate Friendships
In the 1530s Michelangelo was smitten by handsome young nobleman Tommaso Cavalieri and began an ardent friendship with aristocratic widow Vittoria Colonna. He expressed his feelings for these soul mates with sonnets and beautifully finished drawings.

Thursday, March 14 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
The Taj Mahal
The Taj Mahal was built as a memorial for Shah Jahan's beloved wife, Mumtaz Mahal, who died in 1631. Combining Mughal and Persian influences in its soaring white marble domes and minarets, it has become an icon of world architecture.

Thursday, March 14 7:00 – 8:00 pm
The Taj Mahal
The Taj Mahal was built as a memorial for Shah Jahan's beloved wife, Mumtaz Mahal, who died in 1631. Combining Mughal and Persian influences in its soaring white marble domes and minarets, it has become an icon of world architecture.

Friday, March 15 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
The Taj Mahal
The Taj Mahal was built as a memorial for Shah Jahan's beloved wife, Mumtaz Mahal, who died in 1631. Combining Mughal and Persian influences in its soaring white marble domes and minarets, it has become an icon of world architecture.

Thursday, April 11 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Painter to the Queen
Vigée Lebrun’s talent, charm, and ambition made her the favorite portraitist of Marie Antoinette. Her royal connections forced her to flee the French Revolution and work in exile in Italy and for Catherine the Great in St. Petersburg.

Thursday, April 11 7:00 – 8:00 pm
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Painter to the Queen
Vigée Lebrun’s talent, charm, and ambition made her the favorite portraitist of Marie Antoinette. Her royal connections forced her to flee the French Revolution and work in exile in Italy and for Catherine the Great in St. Petersburg.

Friday, April 12 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Elisabeth Vigée Lebrun, Painter to the Queen
Vigée Lebrun’s talent, charm, and ambition made her the favorite portraitist of Marie Antoinette. Her royal connections forced her to flee the French Revolution and work in exile in Italy and for Catherine the Great in St. Petersburg.

Thursday, May 9 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Romaine Brooks
In a nod to last year’s Peggy Guggenheim lecture, Rebecca will impersonate gender-bending expatriate artist Brooks, whose somber tonal portraits capture the world of “Sapphic” intellectuals in her Left Bank circle in the years around World War I.

Thursday, May 9 7:00 – 8:00 pm
Romaine Brooks
In a nod to last year’s Peggy Guggenheim lecture, Rebecca will impersonate gender-bending expatriate artist Brooks, whose somber tonal portraits capture the world of “Sapphic” intellectuals in her Left Bank circle in the years around World War I.

Friday, May 10 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Romaine Brooks
In a nod to last year’s Peggy Guggenheim lecture, Rebecca will impersonate gender-bending expatriate artist Brooks, whose somber tonal portraits capture the world of “Sapphic” intellectuals in her Left Bank circle in the years around World War I.

Thursday, June 13 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Late Turner
J. M. W. Turner wowed early audiences with the power and precision of landscapes inspired by 17th-century Dutch and French painting. But later in his life, critics thought luminous, atmospheric works like The Slave Ship indicated that Turner had gone mad.

Thursday, June 13 7:00 – 8:00 pm
Late Turner
J. M. W. Turner wowed early audiences with the power and precision of landscapes inspired by 17th-century Dutch and French painting. But later in his life, critics thought luminous, atmospheric works like The Slave Ship indicated that Turner had gone mad.

Friday, June 14 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Late Turner
J. M. W. Turner wowed early audiences with the power and precision of landscapes inspired by 17th-century Dutch and French painting. But later in his life, critics thought luminous, atmospheric works like The Slave Ship indicated that Turner had gone mad.

Tickets

Member
$110 ($140 evening)

Non-member
$170 ($200 evening)

REGISTRATION

Space is limited. Passes are sold for the ten-lecture series and are nonrefundable and not interchangeable with other series. Advance registration required. Registrations are processed in the order they are received.

CONFIRMATION

Registration is confirmed by email or mailed receipt. Series passes will be held at Will Call and may be picked up the day of each lecture.

SINGLE TICKETS

Tickets to individual lectures may be available the day of the lecture on a space-available basis. Thursday pm $16 for members/$21 for non-members. Thurs and Fri am $13/$18. Standby is first-come, first-served, one hour prior to the lecture.

CREDIT AND CLOCK HOURS

Continuing-education credits and clock hours are available to educators through Seattle Pacific University (SPU). Payments for fees are paid directly to SPU on the first day of series. Do not include payment for fees with your registration. Lecture Series: $50 for one SPU credit; $20 for ten clock hours.

CANCELLATION

The Frye Art Museum reserves the right to cancel any lecture series. If the Museum cancels a course or class, a full refund will be issued. If participant cancels enrollment more than two weeks prior to start date, a full refund will be issued, less a $25 processing fee. No refunds issued with less than two weeks’ notice. To cancel registration, call 206 432 8200 between 9 am–5 pm Monday–Friday.

MEMBERSHIP

Join the Frye Art Museum and take advantage of member discounts.

Questions? tickets@fryemuseum.org or 206 432 8200.