Louis Moeller (American, 1855-1930)

A Critical Point in the Game

  • Date: ca. 1903
  • Medium: Oil on canvas
  • Object Dimensions: 18 1/8 x 24 1/4 in. (46.04 x 61.6 cm)
  • Credit Line: Founding Collection, Gift of Charles and Emma Frye, 1952.121
  • Photo Credit: Jueqian Fang

Nikolai Nikanorovich Dubovskoi (Russian, 1859-1918)

Seascape with Figures

  • Date: 1899
  • Medium: Oil on canvas
  • Object Dimensions: 65 1/8 x 56 in. (165.42 x 142.24 cm)
  • Credit Line: Founding Collection, Gift of Charles and Emma Frye, 1952.039
  • Photo Credit: Jueqian Fang

Franz von Lenbach (German, 1836-1904)

Marion Lenbach and the Daughter of the Painter Nikolaus Gysis

  • Date: 1899
  • Medium: Oil on paper mounted on board
  • Object Dimensions: 38 x 29 1/8 x 9/16 in. (96.52 x 73.98 x 1.43 cm)
  • Credit Line: Founding Collection, Gift of Charles and Emma Frye, 1952.101
  • Photo Credit: Jueqian Fang

Pieter van Veen (American, born the Netherlands, 1875-1961)

First Snow

  • Date: ca. 1914
  • Medium: Oil on canvas
  • Object Dimensions: 15 x 21 3/16 in. (38.1 x 53.82 cm)
  • Credit Line: Founding Collection, Gift of Charles and Emma Frye, 1952.179
  • Photo Credit: Jueqian Fang
  • Verbal Description: This is a painting of a winter day. The clear, pastel blue sky takes up about three-quarters of the composition and a flat landscape occupies the bottom quarter. Two steel-colored, meandering rivers flank either side of a snow-covered path that dissects the ground vertically into two equal halves. Moving from left to right along the horizon line: a golden triangle of long grasses line the wider of the two rivers and a sliver of gold lines the right bank. At the center is the snow-covered path moving back towards the horizon line. A dark shape off in the distance has just enough details to see that it’s a figure. Just beyond this traveling figure is a light gray rhombus, likely the roof of a house. Moving further to the right along the horizon line are three leafless trees, all about the same height, poking above another house. The second river runs next to this structure with the same golden strips along either side. At the right side of this bank, touching the right side of the painting, is another building. It’s closer than the others. There are no windows, it has dark gray walls and a light gray roof.

Ludwig Knaus (German, 1829-1910)

Drove of Swine: Evening Effect

  • Date: 1878
  • Medium: Oil on canvas
  • Object Dimensions: 19 5/8 x 14 3/8 in. (49.85 x 36.51 cm)
  • Credit Line: Founding Collection, Gift of Charles and Emma Frye, 1952.085
  • Photo Credit: Jueqian Fang

Julius Scheuerer (German, 1859-1913)

Peacock

  • Date: 1907
  • Medium: Oil on canvas
  • Object Dimensions: 36 1/2 x 24 1/2 in. (92.71 x 62.23 cm)
  • Credit Line: Founding Collection, Gift of Charles and Emma Frye, 1952.148
  • Photo Credit: Jueqian Fang
  • Verbal Description: This is a portrait of a peacock. His bright blue, s-shaped head and turquoise comb is in profile near the top center of the painting. His back is displayed to the viewer. He has tan and brown speckled wings, which are separated by iridescent yellow, green, and orange feathers cascading down his back. His tailfeathers are down and move diagonally, reaching the bottom left corner. The long, wispy gold feathers are patterned with emerald circles and deep blue spots. He’s perched on ground that’s been uplifted by the roots of a gray tree that form the letter V with the peacock’s tail. The background has a stand of verdant trees filling most of the left side of the composition. On the right side is a light blue sky filled with wispy clouds and at the bottom, a neon blue stripe of water.

Mathias Schmid (Austrian, 1835-1923)

In a Föhn Storm

  • Date: 1886
  • Medium: Oil on cardboard
  • Object Dimensions: 21 1/4 x 12 5/8 in. (53.98 x 32.07 cm)
  • Credit Line: Founding Collection, Gift of Charles and Emma Frye, 1952.149
  • Photo Credit: Jueqian Fang
  • Verbal Description: The focus of this painting is a young girl, facing away from the viewer on a brown and gray jagged peak, wind sweeping her dress and hair. The ridgeline starts at the bottom right hand of the composition, moves across in a zigzag pattern, and ends midway up the left side of the painting. A baren tree trunk with just a few wisps of green on short branches is on the nearest peak, on the right side of the composition. Moving left, the next and highest peak is where the girl is perched precariously. She has white skin and appears to be bare-footed. She wears a dark-colored, voluminous dress with what looks to be a vermillion-colored petticoat that peaks out at the base of the dress. Underneath her denim apron dress, she wears a three-quarter length white shirt. The wind pushes her garments upward, almost to her shoulders and she uses her left arm to hold down the skirt. Her golden hair is in Heidi braids, wrapped up and around her head, except for a long strand blowing in the wind. A single green leaf flies up to the left corner of the composition. The sky is mostly cloudy, with splotches of blue and pink poking through. A warm golden glow is just barely seen from behind the mountain.

Unknown (Nationality unknown)

Bearded Smoker

  • Date: n.d.
  • Medium: Oil on tin
  • Object Dimensions: 15 x 12 in. (38.1 x 30.48 cm)
  • Credit Line: Bequest of Mrs. Ruth V. Egbert, 1967.001
  • Photo Credit: Jueqian Fang

Sergei Bongart (American, born Ukraine, 1918-1985)

Black & Red

  • Date: 1962
  • Medium: Oil on Masonite
  • Object Dimensions: 30 x 40 in. (76.2 x 101.6 cm)
  • Credit Line: Museum Purchase, 1965.001
  • Photo Credit: Jueqian Fang

Larry Burnham (American)

Las Piñatas (The Piñatas)

  • Date: ca. 1960-71
  • Medium: Oil on canvas
  • Object Dimensions: 31 3/4 x 28 in. (80.65 x 71.12 cm)
  • Credit Line: Museum Purchase, 1971.008
  • Photo Credit: Jueqian Fang
  • Verbal Description: This painting is a portrait of three bird-like forms—piñatas—hung in an upside-down, triangular formation. The creatures’ body shapes resemble a peacock with thick, curved necks, pointed beaks, a slight comb at the top of their head, and long, cascading tailfeathers. Their legs are thin, about as along as their bodies, and disjointed like a flamingo. Each bird is a different solid color, starting at the top right and moving clockwise: magenta, grape, and canary yellow. The piñatas are hung by a thin, straight brown line, connecting the top of each bird back to the top edge of the canvas.
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